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The noun of an absolute phrase can be modified by an adjective. 

          Their shoes muddy, the children were not allowed into the house.

       

The noun of an absolute phrase can be modified by a past participle.

           His keys lost, Bobby searched his apartment frantically.
           Its wings spread, the eagle circled above the lake.

The noun of an absolute phrase can be modified by a past participial phrase.

           Her house destroyed by a tornado, Valentina moved in with her sister.                 

           His baby daughter calmed by a bottle, Jamal continued to clean the kitchen.


The noun of an absolute phrase can be modified by a present participle. 

          Its tires screeching, the car came to a stop before crashing

          His heart racing, Ryan asked his girlfriend to marry him.


The noun of an absolute phrase can be modified by a present participial phrase.

         Their son walking across the stage, Joel and LaToya applauded proudly.

         Confetti fluttering to the ground, the crowed celebrated the new year.


The noun of an absolute phrase can be modified by a prepositional phrase.

           Her mother at work, Eliza let herself into the apartment.

           His car in the shop, Keith took the bus to work.


As the above examples show, absolute phrases that are followed by commas come at the beginning of a sentence.


An absolute phrase that is surrounded by commas can also come after the subject of the clause.

           Joel and Latoya, their son walking across the stage, applauded proudly.

         Ryan, his heart racing, asked his girlfriend to marry him.

         The eagle, its wings spread, circled above the lake.


An absolute phrase that is proceeded by a comma can also come at the end of the clause.

        Joel and Latoya applauded proudly, their son walking across the stage.

        Ryan asked his girlfriend to marry him, his heart racing.

        The eagle circled above the lake, its wings spread.

        Absolute Phrases

An absolute phrase contains a noun that is followed by a word or phrase that describes the noun.  An absolute phrase modifies an entire clause.