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      Correlative Conjunctions

A correlative conjunction is a paired conjunction that links two or more grammatically-equal items.  


Common correlative conjunctions include

     not only...but also

     either...or

     neither...nor

     both...and

     whether...or


The items that correlative conjunctions connect must be parallel.


      --Caidan not only  attends college  but also  works full time.

                  The items in the above sentence are both verb phrases.


     --Sammy studies not only  in the library  but also  at a local coffee shop.

                  The items in the above sentence are both prepositional phrases.

      --So that the kids are not left alone tomorrow, either  I will leave work early, or

      my wife will go to her meeting late.

                  The items in the above sentence are both clauses.


      --Every day, Timothy is either  late or  absent.

                   The items in the above sentence are both adjectives.

       --Neither  Jasmine  nor  Derek showed up for work today.

                  The items in the above sentence are both nouns.


      --Neither  impressed by the performance  nor  satisfied by the meal, Michael and

      Ezra decided they would not return to the dinner theater.  

                  The items in the above sentence are both past participial phrases.


      --Both  running on the deck  and  diving into the pool are prohibited. 

                  The items in the above sentence are both gerund phrases.


      --Working bothquicklyandcarefully, the doctor stitched Beth's cut.

                  The items in the above sentence are both adverbs.

      --Our arrival time will depend on whether we drivethrough the city  or  go

      around it.

                  The items in the above sentence are both verb phrases.


      --Whether  hanging out with friends, attending class, studying in the library, or

      watching a movie alone, Tammy dresses in the latest fashion.

                  The items in the above sentence are all present participial phrases.