Lack of Parallel Structure

Sentences that lack Parallel Structure must be revised so that actions or items in a pair or list have the same grammatical structure.

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--The surgeon operated quickly and with care.

     This sentence is not parallel because the first item is an adverb, and the second item is a                  prepositional phrase.

          --The surgeon operated quickly and carefully.

                   This sentence is parallel because both items are adverbs.    

          --The surgeon operated with speed and with care.

                   This sentence is parallel because both items are prepositional phrases.      

          --The surgeon operated withspeed and care.

                   This sentence is parallel because both items are objects of a preposition.

--Everyone enjoys being around Lena because she is intelligent and has wit.
        This sentence is not parallel because the first item is an adjective and the second item is a                 direct object.
          --Everyone enjoys being around Lena because she is intelligent and             witty.
                    Thissentence is parallel because both items are adjectives.
          --Everyone enjoys being around Lena because she has intelligence                and wit.
                    This sentence is parallel because both items are direct objects.
          --Everyone enjoys being around Lena because she speaks                           intelligently and wittily.
                    This sentence is parallel because both items are adverbs.

--Geoffrey likes running, swimming, and to bike.
       This sentence is not parallel because the first two items are gerunds, and the last item is an              infinitive.
          --Geoffrey likes running, swimming, and biking.
                    This sentence is parallel because all items are gerunds.
          --Geoffrey likes to run, to swim, and to bike.
                     This sentence is parallel because all items are infinitives.
          --Geoffrey likes to  run, swim, and bike.
                     This sentence is parallel because all items are part of an infinitive.

--Frustrated with his grade on the previous assignment and having confusion with the current assignment, Mike went to see his instructor.
        This sentence is not parallel because the first item is a past participial phrase, and the second            item is a present participial phrase.
         --Frustrated with his grade on the previous assignment and confused            by the current assignment, Mike went to see his instructor.
                      This sentence is parallel because both items are past participial phrases.