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    Sentence Run-Ons


A sentence run-on consists of two or more independent clauses that are incorrectly joined together. 


There are two types of sentence run-ons: fused sentences and

comma splices.


A fused sentence consists of two independent clauses with no

punctuation between them.

         --Professor Watson teaches with enthusiasm many students sign up for her class.

         --Jerry loves math his brother hates it.

         --Every day, Jermaine's dad drives him to the bus stop Jermaine takes the bus

           downtown.

A comma-splice consists of two independent clauses with a comma between them.

         --Professor Watson teaches with enthusiasm, many students sign up for her class.

         --Jerry loves math, his brother hates it.

         --Every day, Jermaine's dad drives him to the bus stop, Jermaine takes the bus

           downtown.


Fused sentences and comma splices are equally incorrect.  There are a variety of ways to correct both types of run-ons.


1) Separate the independent clauses with a period.  This will create two simple sentences.

         --Professor Watson teaches with enthusiasm Many students sign up for her class.

         --Jerry loves math.  His brother hates it.

         --Every day, Jermaine's dad drives him to the bus stop.  Jermaine takes the bus

           downtown.


2) Separate the independent clauses with a semi-colon.  This will create one type of compound sentence.

         --Professor Watson teaches with enthusiasm; many students sign up for her class.

         --Jerry loves math; his brother hates it.

         --Every day, Jermaine's dad drives him to the bus stop; Jermaine takes the bus

          downtown.

A transitional expression followed by a comma can come after a semi-colon to help the independent clauses flow together. 

         --Professor Watson teaches with enthusiasm;  therefore, many students sign up for her class.

         --Jerry loves math; however,  his brother hates it.

         --Every day, Jermaine's dad drives him to the bus stop;  after that, Jermaine takes the bus downtown.


3) Separate the independent clauses with a comma and a coordinating conjunction.  This will create another type of compound sentence.

         --Professor Watson teaches with enthusiasm,  so many students sign up for her class.

         --Jerry loves math,  but his brother hates it.

         --Every day, Jermaine's dad drives him to the bus stop,  and Jermaine takes the bus downtown.


4) Turn one of the independent clauses into a dependent clause to create a complex sentence.  A complex sentence that begins with a dependent clause needs a comma after the dependent clause.

         --Because Professor Watson teaches with enthusiasm,  many students sign up for her class.

         --While Jerry loves math, his brother hates it.

         --Every day, after Jermaine's dad drives him to the bus stop,  Jermaine takes the bus downtown.

A complex sentence that begins with an independent clause does not need a comma between the clauses.

         --Many students sign up for Professor Watson's class  because she teaches with

           enthusiasm.

         --Jerry loves math  while his brother hates it.

         --Every day, Jermaine takes the bus downtown after his dad drives him to the bus stop.